4-Star CB Clark Phillips III Announces Top 12 Schools

first_imgClark Phillips returns an interception.MaxPrepsClark Phillips III is one of the top defensive backs in the class of 2020.The junior out of La Habra, California has many of the top programs in the country after him, and last night, he outlined those that currently stand out.Clark Phillips III announced his top 12 via Twitter on Monday night.It doesn’t sound like this is necessarily a list of finalists, at this point in his recruitment.Thank God for putting me in this position ?? pic.twitter.com/8PIVQCFlXZ— Clark Phillips III (@ClarkPhillips28) February 5, 2019The full list: Arizona State, Cal, LSU, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Oregon, Penn State, Tennessee, Texas A&M, Utah, Vanderbilt, and Washington.There are no crystal ball predictions over at 247 for where he will wind up committing.Phillips is ranked No. 53 overall in the class.He’s No. 6 among cornerbacks, and No. 9 in the state of California.This fall, he recorded 18 tackles, 10 pass deflections and two interceptions at cornerback, and was also a very productive receiver for La Habra. On offense, Phillips went for 1,210 yards and 19 touchdowns on the season.The SEC seems to be factoring into Phillips’ recruitment in a big way. Alabama, which did not crack this top 12, hosted in back in June, and he took unofficial visits to LSU and Texas A&M, both of which are on the list, for games in November.last_img read more

IMO Moves to Address Maritime Corruption

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is to address maritime corruption by including the issue in its work programme for the Facilitation Committee. The decision to include an anti-corruption agenda came at the latest meeting of the IMO’s Facilitation Committee (FAL) in response to a submission from Liberia, Marshall Islands, Norway, United Kingdom, United States and Vanuatu.The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) co-sponsored the submission along with a number of other non-governmental organisations (NGOs).“Corruption erodes trust in government and undermines the social contract. Corruption impedes investment, with consequent effects on growth and jobs. This is a global issue but we all need to work to eradicate corrupt practices,” Guy Platten, Secretary General of the International Chamber of Shipping, said.According to the Maritime Anti-Corruption Networks anonymous reporting mechanism, which was set up in 2011, there have been over 28,000 incidents already reported.“We are all aware that corruption in the maritime sector exists in many areas and as we have heard from the document introduction, corrupt practices, particularly with respect to the ship/shore interface, can lead to interruptions to normal operations, can incur higher operational costs for the shipowner and can have an impact on seafarers’ well-being,” Chris Oliver, Nautical Director at the International Chamber of Shipping, said.“In addition to the potential consequences for ship owners and seafarers, it should not be underestimated the impact it can have on trade, investment, social and economic development of ports, local communities and even Member States themselves,” Oliver concluded.last_img read more

International Day of Persons with Disabilities Symposium

first_imgExploring ways to make the workplace more inclusive and improving access to supports, services and transitional programs in the education system for persons with disabilities will be the focus of the Second Annual Symposium on Inclusive Employment and Education on Thursday, Dec. 3. Held on the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the event will highlight best practices from employers, educators and community organizations around the province. “In Nova Scotia, one in every five people live with a disability,” said Anne MacRae, executive director of the Disabled Persons Commission. “Ensuring students with disabilities have access to proper supports and transitional programs to post-secondary education and the workforce plays a critical role in gaining meaningful employment. “It is the key to increasing participation and beneficial for everyone involved.” The theme of the this year’s symposium is Bridging the Needs Between Education and Employment — Best Practices. The keynote address will be delivered by David Sampson, vice-chair of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. It features workshops and panels on topics such as government and community partnerships, best practices from community leaders, learning sessions focused on specific disabilities, and what educators and employers need to know from a human rights perspective. “One of our highest areas of complaints revolves around disability and employment, but it doesn’t need to be that way,” said Krista Daley, director and CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. “The symposium is about providing information so that both employers and employees know what they need to do to create a respectful and inclusive work environment, and to celebrate organizations that have been successful in achieving this.” Another highlight of the day is a luncheon sponsored by the Collaborative Partnership Network. It will feature the Lieutenant Governor’s Employer Partnership Award for Persons with Disabilities to honour employers and persons with disabilities that have done positive work in their communities. “The Collaborative Partnership Network applauds our champion employers and their employees. Investment in people and partnership leads to dedicated and loyal employees with the right skills for the job,” said Janice Ainsworth, co-chair of the Collaborative Partnership Network. “The award recognizes outstanding contributions made by employers and employees for demonstrated commitment to increase the hiring, accommodating, retaining or promoting persons with disabilities in the workplace.” The symposium will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Westin Nova Scotian Hotel, 1181 Hollis St., Halifax. For ticket information, call 422-8900 or e-mail bmurphy@teamworkcooperative.org . The event is sponsored in partnership with the Disabled Persons Commission, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission and the Collaborative Partnership Network. The symposium is a scent-free event.last_img read more

HIV in 2019 Who weve left behind

first_imgIn today’s Big Story podcast, HIV may not be as prominent in North American media as it was 30 years ago, but people still live with it. It still has no cure, and still plenty of stigma. While it is true that the advancements in HIV treatments help make the infection easier to live with, it’s dangerous to use that as an excuse to ignore the very real needs of those affected.What are the struggles that people with HIV face every single day? What can be done to help? And in the 30+ year shift in our discussion around HIV/Aids, who have we left behind?Today’s discussion is mostly about women living with HIV. It’s about the different realities they face, the extra barriers they have to get around, and the importance of having spaces where they can feel a sense of community.GUESTS: Eno Akan-Essien, women’s community development coordinator for WHAI & Molly Bannerman, director of WHAI Audio Playerhttps://media.blubrry.com/thebigstory/s/chtbl.com/track/G9G45/rogers-aod.leanstream.co/rogers/thebigstory_dai/tbs_08222019_dai.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and SpotifyYou can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.last_img read more

Hedge fund Mason Capital says Telus voting shareholders need compensation

by News Staff Posted Sep 27, 2012 5:26 pm MDT Hedge fund Mason Capital says Telus voting shareholders need compensation A U.S. hedge fund called Telus’s plan for a single class of common shares one of Canada’s “worst” share collapse deals in years, saying there must be compensation for voting shareholders.Mason Capital Management and Telus are locked in battle over the Canadian company’s plan to convert its dual-class share structure of common shares (TSX:T) that have voting rights and non-voting A shares (NYSE:TU).The New York-based investment firm said Thursday it wants to protect the value of voting shares, a message it has delivered to the Vancouver telecom company for months.“This is one of the worst share collapse deals for voting shareholders in Canada since at least the year 2000,” said Michael Martino, principal and co-founder of Mason Capital.Mason Capital said it believes a conversion ratio of 1.08, or an eight-per-cent premium, would be appropriate under the share conversion plan.“Our view is that there’s no noticeable value and the voting shareholders just lose,” Martino told a conference call.“Even if there were some value created by the share collapse, it’s our view is that it has to be shared appropriately. It all can’t just go or predominantly go to the non-voting shareholders.”The hedge fund defeated Telus’s plan last spring to convert its non-voting shares on a one-to-one basis.Telus chief financial officer Robert McFarlane said the company isn’t offering a premium for the share conversion because both classes of shareholders will benefit.“It will benefit both the voting and the non-voting shares by combining the liquidity and the marketability of the shares, leading to a listing of the voting shares for the first time on the New York Stock Exchange,” he said.Mason Capital owns about 19 per cent of Telus’s voting stock, making it the largest voting shareholder. But Mason has also disclosed that it has short sold the company’s non-voting shares. Short sellers make a profit when the stock price falls.Martino also said the hedge fund is legally challenging Telus’s assertion that 50 per cent — not two thirds — of voting shareholders need to support its share conversion proposal.At the Oct. 17 meeting, Telus will need to garner two-thirds support from non-voting shareholders. However, the threshold for voting shares has been lowered from two thirds to half, which should make it more difficult for Mason to block it again, Telus has said.Mason is appealing another decision that prevents it from holding a meeting for only Telus voting shareholders on Oct. 17. That case will be heard next Thursday.Mason also said consolidating the two classes of shares — voting and non-voting — will not create value for all shareholders.During the call, Mason said Telus’s management team and board of directors, who collectively own significantly more non-voting than voting shares, stand to make more than $4 million from the dual class conversion at the expense of voting shareholders.McFarlane said when the share conversion plan was announced last February the shares prices of both classes went up and have increased even more since then.“So it shows that it’s a benefit to both classes of shares. Lastly, it’s consistent with good corporate governance where one share gets one vote,” he said from Vancouver.Mason has slightly reduced its position in Telus — by two million shares — and McFarlane said it could be a sign of things to come.“I would say it indicates that Mason is expecting to lose the vote. They’re reducing their economic exposure.”The various legal challenges by Mason shows “they’re trying to throw spaghetti against the wall to think of any reason why you can drive the spread between the two (classes) wider because that’s how they make money.”McFarlane said he wouldn’t be surprised if Mason comes up with more legal manoeuvres.“These are New York hedge fund guys about to lose a lot of money and reputations have been tarnished so they’ve got the full court press. But we’re confident that we will be successful.”Shares in Telus closed down 27 cents at $62.16 on the Toronto tock Exchange, while non-voting shares on the New York Stock Exchange closed up 26 cents to $62.95. read more

Nearly 70 years after Dick Tracy wore a wrist radio Samsung introduces

Nearly 70 years after Dick Tracy wore a wrist radio, Samsung introduces watch that makes calls by Frank Jordans, The Associated Press Posted Sep 5, 2013 1:19 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email BERLIN – Nearly 70 years after Dick Tracy began wearing a two-way wrist radio in the funny pages, the technology that once seemed impossibly futuristic will be widely available by Christmas.Samsung on Wednesday introduced a digital watch for the holiday season that will let users check messages with a glance at their wrists and have conversations secret agent-style.So-called smartwatches have been around for several years. But so far, they have failed to attract much consumer interest. That may change with the Samsung Galaxy Gear, which offers the company a chance to pull off the same as feat Apple did with the iPad — popularize a type of device that has lingered mostly unnoticed on store shelves.The Gear must be linked wirelessly with a smartphone to perform its full range of functions. It acts as an extension to the phone by discreetly alerting users to incoming messages and calls on its screen, which measures 1.63 inches diagonally.“With Gear, you’re able to make calls and receive calls without ever taking your phone out of your pocket,” Pranav Mistry, a member of Samsung’s design team, told reporters at the launch in Berlin ahead of the annual IFA consumer electronics show here.Sony and Qualcomm also introduced smartwatches Wednesday. Apple Inc. is expected to release its own smartwatch, though it’s not clear yet when. The release of separate products from so many manufacturers could stir interest in smartwatches in general. Meanwhile, Google is working on Google Glass — a device designed to work like a smartphone and worn like a pair of glasses.With smartphones and tablets now ubiquitous, electronics companies are trying to create a new category of products that put advanced computing technology into everyday objects such as wristwatches and glasses. Research firm Gartner projects that wearable smart electronics will be a $10 billion industry by 2016.But Ramon Llamas, an analyst at research firm IDC, said many things have to go right for smartwatches to succeed. Llamas said the devices need to offer a range of useful applications that justify carrying around — and charging — another digital device.“It can’t just be notifications of how many incoming messages you have,” he said. “Health applications seem to be the low-hanging fruit.”For starters, the Gear will work with sporting and fitness apps such as RunKeeper, which tracks runs and other workouts.Gartner analyst Carolina Milanesi believes it ought to do more, such as monitor a user’s pulse and other health information. Other sensors, she said, could also authenticate a user’s identity when making payments or detect locations so users could share their whereabouts with their friends.“The watch is smart, but not as smart as it could be,” Milanesi said. “It doesn’t look like Samsung pushed the envelope as much as I hope Apple will. Right now, it looks like (Gear) will just provide you with an extra screen that is more convenient to look at than to have to take out a larger device. I don’t think that’s what consumers want.”The Gear goes on sale in the United States and Japan next month. The rest of the world will get it sooner, on Sept. 25, with prices starting at $299. That is about twice the price of currently available devices such as the Sony SmartWatch and the Pebble, which was funded through more than $10 million pledged by individuals on fundraising website Kickstarter. Another startup, also funded through Kickstarter, hopes to launch a stand-alone watch called Omate TrueSmart that comes with built-in cell connectivity.Samsung Electronics Co.’s smartwatch uses Google’s Android operating system, just like many of the phones and tablets made by the South Korean electronics company.Mistry demonstrated the calling function on the Gear by holding it up to his ear and talking into a microphone hidden in the watch. The watch then relays the call to a smartphone over a built-in Bluetooth connection.The strap, which comes in six colours, holds a basic camera that can be used to shoot photos and video. When linked to a smartphone or tablet, the Gear lets people check emails and Facebook updates from their wrists. Samsung said replies are possible through voice dictation. Voice commands can also be used for such tasks as setting alarms, creating calendar entries and checking the weather.The Gear will be compatible initially with two Samsung products also unveiled Wednesday — the Galaxy Note 3, a smartphone with a giant 5.7-inch screen and a digital pen, and the Galaxy Tab 10.1, a tablet computer with a 10.1-inch screen comparable to Apple’s full-sized iPad. But Samsung promised to update other Galaxy phones and tablets to work with the Gear in the future.The number of apps that work with the Gear is also still limited. More than 70 apps are currently supported, including Facebook, Twitter and RunKeeper. That compares with the hundreds of thousands available for leading smartphones.Unlike normal watches that can tick away for years on end, Samsung only promises a full day’s use out of the Gear before it has to be charged.Apple’s plans for a smartwatch aren’t known, but the company has been seeking a trademark for the iWatch name. The company is widely believed to be developing a watch that works on the same software as its iPhone and iPad, although it’s unclear if it will be ready before the holidays. An announcement event next week is expected to be on new iPhones. Apple declined to comment Wednesday.Meanwhile, Qualcomm didn’t disclose a specific price or date for the Toq, beyond saying it will come out this year. Sony didn’t provide many details about its SmartWatch 2 either. The focus of its announcement Wednesday was a new smartphone with a high-resolution camera.Robert-Jan Broer, head of Germany-based market research firm Chronolytics, said many people who have stopped wearing watches because they are surrounded by time-telling devices might consider buying a smartwatch.Brian Profitt, a technology expert and adjunct instructor of management at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, said the real question is whether the Samsung watch “will make the purchase of yet-another smart device worth it.”“It’s great to have hands-free capabilities to take notes or snap a picture,” Profitt said. “But it is $299 great? That’s going to be the real test for the Galaxy Gear.”___AP Technology Writers Youkyung Lee in Suwon, South Korea, and Michael Liedtke in San Francisco contributed to this report.___Lee can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/YKLeeAP . Frank Jordans can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/wirereporter . read more

MACA gets BHP crushing and screening contract for lump and fines at

first_imgMACA Ltd advises it has executed a framework agreement to provide crushing and screening services to BHP in the Pilbara region. The work package to be undertaken will consist of crushing and screening services of lump and finesat Mining Area C (up to 12 Mt/y), commencing around October 2018.The contract term is for three years plus two by one year options to extend, and will utilise both new and existing crushing equipment. With additional minor works being undertaken in the Pilbara, the combined value of these works is expected to generate revenues up to A$27.5 million per annum.MACA Managing Director Chris Tuckwell commented: “MACA would like to thank BHP for the opportunity to work with them. We look forward to a long-standing relationship with BHP, working closely together to ensure mutual success.”last_img read more

Karamanlis OSCE summit a success for diplomacy

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Prime Minister Costas Karamanlis last week described as “a great success for Greek foreign policy” a meeting on Corfu of foreign ministers of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) at which proposals for a new European security structure were thrashed out.“It is a great success for Greek foreign policy that the 56 countries of the OSCE responded to our invitation and are here today to discuss openly, in a free and sincere dialogue, all the problems affecting Europe and particularly security concerns,” Karamanlis said.Though the summit focused on broader issues of security as well as the strengthening of relations between NATO and Russia following Moscow’s military intervention in Georgia last year, it also gave Athens, which currently holds the OSCE’s rotating presidency, the opportunity to make some headway on issues of domestic interest; these include the problem of illegal immigration, tensions in the Aegean, the Cyprus problem and Greece’s efforts to secure visa-free US travel.Bakoyannis took advantage of her platform before high-ranking diplomats to stress the need for closer cooperation to curb illegal immigration, which has become a serious problem in Greece and other countries on the EU’s external borders, such as Italy. Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, who attended the summit, was said to be in close agreement with Karamanlis on issues of immigration.US Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg, replacing Hillary Clinton who pulled out of a scheduled appearance due to an arm injury, stressed that Washington shared Greece’s concern on issues ranging from illegal immigration to the division of Cyprus. In an interview with state television, Steinberg said that it was “in the common interest” of Athens and Washington to tackle a burgeoning influx to Europe of illegal immigrants, due to the security threat this may pose.Steinberg also expressed concern about the recent increase in violations of Greek air space by Turkish jets in the Aegean and stressed Washington’s backing for a comprehensive solution to the Cyprus problem.last_img read more

La Cité des Sciences de Naples ravagée par les flammes dun énorme

first_imgLa Cité des Sciences de Naples ravagée par les flammes d’un énorme incendieLa Cité des Sciences, située dans le quartier de Bagnoli à l’ouest de Naples, vient d’être détruite par un incendie déclenché dans la nuit de lundi à mardi. Les autorités enquêtent actuellement sur les causes de cette catastrophe.”Naples est aujourd’hui de cendres” introduit gravement Roberto Saviano, journaliste à La Reppublica, quotidien italien. De la Cité des Sciences située dans le quartier de Bagnoli à l’ouest de la ville, il ne reste désormais que les fondements encore fumants surplombant la mer. Quatre des cinq pavillons, comprenant notamment le musée interactif et son planétarium ont été complètement détruits. Si les murs ont résisté, toutes les expositions ont quant à elles brulé.L’incendie, déclenché dans la nuit de lundi à mardi a duré près de 13 heures. Par chance, les flammes n’ont fait aucune victime. D’ordinaire, le centre est rempli de classes ou de familles en visite, assistées par 160 employés. Cependant, celui-ci ferme tous les lundis de période hivernale, et était vide au moment de la catastrophe. Des équipes de pompiers se sont ainsi attelées à enrayer l’incendie pendant des heures avant d’y parvenir.Les enquêteurs travaillent actuellement à déterminer les causes de l’incendie qui semble être de nature criminelle. Selon les informations communiquées, il semblerait que le feu ait été déclenché en six points, sur le côté de la structure, face à la mer et cachés des caméras de surveillance.  Plusieurs scénarios ont été envisagés mais aucun n’a été pour le moment prouvé. Un appel aux dons lancé sur Twitter À lire aussiLe Vésuve, ce redoutable volcan dont l’éruption a détruit Pompéi”Nous faisons confiance à la magistrature pour mener les enquêtes les plus approfondies possibles” a déclaré dans un communiqué le maire de la ville, Luigi de Magistris. Il est encore trop tôt pour mesurer l’ampleur des dégât et le coût des travaux que nécessite la reconstruction de la Cité des Sciences. Toutefois, la structure a d’ores et déjà diffusé sur son compte Twitter ses identifiants bancaires pour récolter les dons des citoyens italiens et du monde entier.La Cité des sciences de Naples est un musée interactif conçu sur le modèle de la Cité des sciences et de l’Industrie situé dans le quartier de la Villette à Paris. Inauguré en 1996, la structure est l’aboutissement d’un plan de revitalisation d’une ancienne zone industrielle. Au fil des années, celle-ci s’est construite une renommée internationale et fait partie des cent pôles d’excellence italiens. Le centre a reçu en 2005 le titre du meilleur musée des sciences en Europe, décerné par l’Union Européenne puis, l’année suivante, le prix Descartes, pour la communication scientifique. En 2007, il est également devenu le meilleur incubateur de nouvelles entreprises. Le 6 mars 2013 à 14:14 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Daisy Ho appointed new Chairman of SJM Holdings

first_img Pansy Ho becomes first Macau casino boss to speak out for Hong Kong government on protests Load More Macau concessionaire SJM Holdings has confirmed Daisy Ho as the new Chairman of the company following the retirement of her father and Macau gaming kingpin Stanley Ho on Tuesday.Dr Ho – whose company STDM, the parent company of SJM, held a 40-year monopoly on casino gaming in Macau before liberalization – officially stepped down from his role at SJM at the company’s annual general meeting this week. His position has now been filled by his daughter. Daisy Ho, 53, was already an Executive Director of the company and sits on the boards of a number of other prominent companies including Shun Tak Holdings, where she is Deputy Managing Director and Chief Financial Officer.Her new role as Chairman of SJM Holdings comes with no fixed term and sees her entitled to an annual base fee of HK$1 million per year and annual allowances of HK$1.3 million from the group, the company announced.Also promoted to the roles of Co-Chairmen on Tuesday were directors Timothy Fok and Angela Leong, Dr Ho’s wife.Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer Ambrose So has been appointed Vice-Chairman in addition to his existing positions.Dr Ho was granted the honorary title of Chairman Emeritus after stepping down. Lack of premium mass strategy begs questions of SJM’s Grand Lisboa Palace launch: analysts Melco likely to pass Australian regulatory inquiry, target full Crown acquisition: Bernstein RelatedPostslast_img read more

BRAC Coming Soon Principi Says

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A new BRAC round is closer than ever, with Congress certain to approve the next round by 2019, Anthony Principi, chairman of the 2005 BRAC Commission, said Thursday.“If I was a betting man, between now and 2019, I’d say 100 percent,” Principi, chairman of the Principi Group, told the Tampa Tribune following the monthly meeting of the Florida Defense Support Task Force.The new round most likely would be conducted in 2019, he said, although there is a chance that a grand bargain between Congress and the White House could force a BRAC to be held in 2017.Florida Sen. Bill Nelson (D), however, disagreed with Principi’s assessment. “I don’t see a BRAC happening anytime soon as there’s not enough interest in Congress for having one,” Nelson, a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said in an email to the Tribune.Principi said Tampa’s MacDill Air Force Base is well positioned to survive a base closure round, but stressed the importance of continuing to carry out the day-to-day activities needed to support the installation.“I think MacDill will fare OK,” Principi said. “I learned as chairman of the last BRAC commission that you cannot assume any installation is safe. You have to make preparations and do the things to enhance the military value and reduce cost of operations. All those things are factors. There are low risks and high risks in every state and community,” he said.Establishing public-private partnerships, sharing the cost of operations, improving school systems and “making Washington aware of all the good things happening at MacDill” are the kinds of efforts that will help protect the installation, Principi said.“Florida is way out ahead of where other states are in being prepared. It is all about preparation. Once you make the [BRAC] list, the history is that there is an 86 percent chance of staying on the list,” he noted.last_img read more

Sen Sullivan talks erosion Donlin Mine and jobs in YK Delta visit

first_imgSenator Dan Sullivan (Photo courtesy of Dan Sullivan)U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan visited 11 Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta villages in four days last week.Listen now“I was joking with my staff that I must have gained five to 10 pounds from all that great salmon that I ate,” Sullivan joked.Sullivan listened as villagers asked him about jobs, erosion and discussed their concerns about the proposed Donlin mine. How to prepare for and respond to erosion is one of the biggest problems facing many communities in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta for villages like Newtok, Napakiak and Chefornak. Chefornak is one of the villages that Sullivan visited; it sits near the coast.“It was a concern because some of those houses are really close to the shore,” Bernadette Lewis, the Executive Director for Chefornak Traditional Council, said.Lewis claimed that some of the houses sit about 10 feet from some bodies of water and that it’s expensive to move houses.“We don’t have funding if we’re going to move homes away from the shore,” Lewis said.Sullivan says that the main problem is getting funding that is already available delivered to those communities who need it. He says that funding was increased for the Denali Commission, a federal agency that is helping some communities move. But, he says that the best solutions will come from community members.“One of the solutions is to build our own housing with our own materials,” Sullivan said.The Y-K Delta is one of Alaska’s most impoverished regions, and that makes job growth a top concern among residents. Again, Sullivan points to community innovation as the best solution.One industry that could spur job growth is mining. The proposed Donlin gold mine promises more than 3,200 jobs at the height of its construction, and 1,000 annually.Sullivan wouldn’t say outright whether he supports the mine, but he does say that the permitting process could be streamlined.“They have to meet a very high standard. The standard is they can’t impact the natural resource that we already have out there, and that is the fish,” Sullivan said. “But the way I see, it’s incumbent on the federal government to move that along.”And Sullivan says there were concerns about the route of the proposed gas line that would provide the fuel to power the mine’s operations. Donlin Gold, the company developing the mine, plans to build a 300-mile pipeline from Cook Inlet, across the Alaska Range, to the site.last_img read more

Blizzards Overwatch could seriously replace Team Fortress 2

first_imgBlizzard’s first FPS is still far from release, but that didn’t stop the company from demoing Overwatch at its PAX East booth. I got to play two full rounds of the Team Fortress 2-like shooter, and even this early (a closed beta isn’t even planned until this fall), it looks like a legit successor to TF2. Watch the video below for the full 20-minute play session.The map had a standard attack-defend layout in a Japanese castle. As an attacker, I had to stand in the capture zones long enough to take them in the first round, and as a defender, I had to kill enemies before they could capture zones in the second round. Simple, and a lot like Control Point mode. in TF2 Also like in TF2, I had my pick from several offensive, defensive, and support characters to do it.The Overwatch demo had 14 different playable characters, spread across different roles and with wildly different designs. There’s a dwarf engineer named Torbjorn who can build turrets and drop ammo packs. There’s a woman in a rocket-launching suit of powered armor named Pharah who can hover. There’s Zarya, a distaff version of the TF2 Heavy with wild pink hair and very fun gravity manipulating powers. There’s a sort-of-knight with a sledgehammer and an energy shield named Reinhardt. And those archetypes don’t even count the robot guru (Kenyatta), the cowboy (McCree), the samurai archer (Hanzo), the cyborg angel (Mercy), or the genius gorilla (Winston). It’s a bit nuts.I tried out most of the characters, and got thoroughly wrecked through the attack round as I figured out how they all played. There’s a lot of variety here, with each character getting a handful of weapons and skills, like in a MOBA. Reaper, the assassin ghost, dual wields shotguns and can spin around and attack everyone around him, or teleport to different locations within his line-of-sight, or simply become intangible and invulnerable for a time (but unable to attack). McCree, on the other hand, can fire his revolvers one shot at a time or empty the cylinder with an alt fire, dive forward with an evasive roll, and slow down time to mark and then kill enemies around him with a very Red Dead Redemption-like special attack. Reinhardt can project an energy shield forward to completely block attacks until it shatters, charge forward and slam enemies, and swing his hammer.In a very MOBA-like touch, each character has an ultimate ability on a timer they can use to sway the fight, like Reaper’s Death Blossom spin, McCree’s Deadeye mark-and-kill attack, and Reinhardt’s area-of-effect Earthshatter attack. It’s like every character has their own version of an Ubercharge/Kritzkrieg.The characters all play wildly different, again calling back to the nine unique classes of Team Fortress 2. Reinhardt is slow like the Heavy and doesn’t have a ranged attack, but he can absorb damage like a sponge and could help a team get past choke points. Hanzo and Widowmaker respectively play like the Sniper with a bow and the Sniper with a rifle, but with their own tricks to mix things up; Hanzo has trick shots and can grab ledges, while Widowmaker can use a grappling hook (with a long cooldown) to reach good sniping positions. Tracer is like the Scout crossed with the Flash; she runs extremely quickly, and while she can’t double-jump she can short-range teleport everywhere. I can see balance issues becoming a problem (Tracer players seemed to dominate from the other rounds I watched), but the variety of roles will mean some very interesting team dynamics. It’s not quite the huge selection of MOBA games like DOTA 2 or League of Legends, but there are more choices than in Team Fortress 2, and with more mechanisms to keep track of.After getting destroyed constantly in the first round, I settled on Torbjorn in the second. I play Engineer when on defense in TF2, and Torbjorn is the most Engineer-like character Overwatch has. He can’t build teleporters or dispensers, but he can build and upgrade turrets and drop armor packs. He even uses scrap — pickups that only appear to him that enable his turret upgrades — and he performs those upgrades by hitting things with his hammer. He’s really Engineery. His ultimate attack is Molten Core, which super-charges him and gives him unlimited scrap so he can rapidly max out his turret and then beat enemies to death with his hammer. It’s also a shout-out to one of the first raids in World of Warcraft.Torbjorn, the engineer.I set up a turret near the capture point, in a corner where it could target enemies coming in from any direction. It performed well when I deployed it, but it really shined when I collected scrap to upgrade it to level three. I ended up getting the play of the game thanks to the turret, which got five kills in quick succession while I ran around the map like an idiot. Hilariously, the play was displayed at the end of the round from my point of view, which showed messages of my turret killing enemies while I tried unsuccessfully to jump over a gap and ended up dying. Voice chat was enabled, and I heard all 11 other players laughing at the sight.Blizzard plans a closed beta for Overwatch this fall, but we probably won’t see open access to the game until 2016. It’s not clear whether it will be released as a full-price retail game, or if Blizzard will take a free-to-play MOBA approach. Based on what I’ve seen, however, it could be the varied, team-based, colorful shooter for which we’ve been waiting to succeed Team Fortress 2. TF2 is still a great game, but it’s been around for eight years, and we could use a new take on the idea.last_img read more

Smart Dog Collar Is Like a Mood Ring for Your Canine Companion

first_img Geek Pick: Fi Smart Dog Collar Sniffs Out Your PetMan Saves Dog Left Tied to Electrical Cord on Side of Interstate Overpass Stay on target Humans have a tendency of attaching very human-like motivations to the behavior of our canine companions, but what if there were a way to actually know what your dog was thinking? That’s the goal of Inupathy, a smart dog collar that aims to use your dog’s vitals to determine how he or she is feeling absent any understanding of the animal’s body language.Inupathy is a harness that slips around the dog’s front legs and rests on the back. It has an LED on the back section that glows different colors to indicate different moods — like a mood ring for dogs. The data gathered by Inupathy appears to be limited to heart rate. While that’s not enough to know what a dog is thinking, it’s definitely a useful metric to gauge behavior. Inupathy can estimate when your dog is happy, calm, excited, or concentrating. There’s also an app that can track these conditions over time.The inventor of Inupathy, Japanese biologist Joji Yamaguchi, says Inupathy has helped him learn about more subtle aspects of his dog’s behavior. For example, Inupathy indicated Yamaguchi’s dog was more agitated when the door of a room is open than when it’s closed. That’s all well and good, but most dog owners will tell you they have a pretty good handle on how their dog is feeling based on body language. For the more obvious behavioral stuff, like being excited or happy, dogs already have a built-in mechanism to help us understand them — it’s called a tail.You can’t get the Inupathy right now, but pre-orders were sold for $169 and should ship soon. That does seem high when your dog already has a tail.last_img read more

Study shows competitive swimmer bodies consistent in morphology across race event lengths

first_img More information: Christian M. Gagnon et al. Elite swimmers do not exhibit a body mass index trade-off across a wide range of event distances, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2018.0684AbstractThere is a trade-off reflected in the contrasting phenotypes of elite long-distance runners, who are typically leaner, and elite sprinters, who are usually more heavily muscled. It is unclear, however, whether and how swimmers’ bodies vary across event distances from the 50 m swim, which is about a 20–30 s event, to the 10 000 m marathon swim, which is about a 2 h event. We examined data from the 2012 Olympics to test whether swimmers’ phenotypes differed across event distances. We show that across all swimming event distances, from the 50 m sprint to the 10 000 m marathon, swimmers converge on a single optimal body mass index (BMI) in men’s and women’s events, in marked contrast with the strong inverse relationship between BMI and event distance found in runners. The absence of a speed–endurance trade-off in the body proportions of swimmers indicates a fundamental difference in design pressures and performance capability in terrestrial versus aquatic environments. The impact of extreme exercise on breathing in GB Olympic boxers and swimmers Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Explore further A trio of researchers with Hunter College of the City University of New York has found that despite swimming in vastly different events, competitive swimmers tend to have the same body mass index (BMI). In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Christian Gagnon, Michael Steiper and Herman Pontzer describe their study of elite swimmer morphology and how it compared to elite runner morphology. Most people have likely recognized the differences in the way elite runners are built—those who run short distances very fast tend to have a lot of muscle. Those who run for very long distances, on the other hand, tend to be very thin. These differences make sense logically—carrying extra muscle or fat in long-distance running would require more energy expenditure. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if the same might be true for swimmers.To learn more about elite swimmer morphology, the researchers accessed a publicly available database that holds information for Olympic athletes. For their study, they focused on swimmers competing in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London—and only those who swam freestyle (aka the Australian crawl). For each athlete, they looked at height, weight and in which events they swam. The first two metrics allowed them to calculate a BMI for each athlete, which they used as a means for comparing morphology between swimmers.The researchers discovered that elite swimmers all tended to have a similar morphology regardless of the events in which they swam. Those who swam short 50-meter races had approximately the same BMI as those who swam much longer 10,000-meter marathons. They did note that male and female swimmers had slightly different BMI averages—23 for men and 21 for women, and that height did not appear to play a factor in different length events.The researchers suggest that the differences in morphology between swimmers and runners is likely due to gravity. Runners have to carry weight with them as they run; swimmers, on the other hand, do not—their weight is borne by the water.center_img Citation: Study shows competitive swimmer bodies consistent in morphology across race event lengths (2018, August 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-competitive-swimmer-bodies-morphology-event.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Credit: CC0 Public Domain © 2018 Phys.orglast_img read more

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first_img CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Conference Coverage View all 396 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Information Technology View all 220 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Videos | December 14, 2011 Konica-Minolta Features New DR Solutions Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Technology Reports View all 9 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imagingcenter_img Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System During RSNA 2011, Konika-Minolta showed its Aero series of digital radiography (DR) detectors, DR retrofit kits for portable X-ray systems, a full-overhead DR system and the Informity Cloud image storage solution. Aero DR Portable Solution – Konica Minolta introduces a new portable X-ray upgrade kit to efficiently turn portable X-ray systems into digital, wireless solutions. The Aero DR Portable Retrofit Solution is designed for a quick, easy and inexpensive transformation from analog to digital. With a very small footprint, the unit can be installed and stored inside the cassette storage bin. The built-in Aero DR roaming feature allows any Aero DR panel to be shared and used between portable and general radiology rooms. Lightweight and cable free operation of the Aero DR wireless digital flat panel detector systems allows for easy patient and image detector positioning.17 x 17 Aero DR Plate – The lightweight, wireless Aero DR plate is now available as a 17 x 17 inch plate. The flat panel detector incorporates Konica Minoltaâ??s Cesium Iodide (CsI) scintillator that boasts ultra-high detector quantum efficiency (DQE) for high-quality images even with minimum X-ray dose exposure. By combining the CsI panel and Konica Minoltaâ??s image processing technology from its top-rated REGIUS systems, the Aero DR assures end users of consistent and reliable high quality imaging. The detector design fits existing wall stands and bucky trays without modifications to help a facility maximize its investment in existing equipment and deliver a universal fit solution.ImagePilot Sigma with Informity – The ImagePilot Sigma digital radiography solution can now be combined with Informity â?? Konica Minoltaâ??s cloud-based archive, disaster recovery, image sharing and information portal solution. With Informity, users can collaborate with referring physicians and other specialists, receive remote support including software updates and virus protection, and access service and support history and status. ImagePilot Sigma features the new Regius Sigma tabletop CR reader weighing less than 62 lbs with a small footprint. Flexible plate technology enhances its compact design and cost effectiveness. ImagePilot Sigma is easy to use with a touchscreen user interface and offers unmatched reliability with few replacement parts.For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.last_img read more

6 top Costa Rica sports stories of 2014

first_imgFootball is by far Costa Rica’s favorite sport, so it’s not surprising that 2014 will be remembered as a year of impressive performances by both “Las Ticas” and “Los Ticos.”“La Sele,” as Ticos affectionately call the Men’s National Team, reached the quarterfinals of the FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014, an achievement that finally outmached what the 1990 team did in Italy at the country’s first World Cup appearance. At the time, La Sele advanced to the knockout stage in an accomplishment remembered this year in a film succinctly entitled “Italia 90.”But Costa Rica’s other Sele also made headlines, as the Women’s National Team earned its first qualification to a World Cup and currently are preparing for the competition that will take place in Canada next year.In addition, the country in 2014 also held for the first time a FIFA World event in March-April, when it hosted the FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup.Here’s a roundup of Costa Rica’s most important sports news of the year:1. La Sele, undefeated, reaches quarterfinals at the FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014 Costa Rica’s forward Bryan Ruiz (R) heads the ball to score as Italy’s goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon (2nd R) can only look on. Ruiz’s goal was the difference in the 1-0 shock victory. Javier Soriano/AFPFew teams arrived in Brazil with a bigger underdog label than Costa Rica. The World Cup’s draw in December 2013 resulted in the country joining Group D —nicknamed “The Group of Death” — with three former world champions: England, Uruguay and Italy.That label turned into a movie-like run for Los Ticos, as they ended the first stage atop the group with unexpected upsets against Uruguay and Italy, and a tie with England that quieted many critics, oddsmakers and rival teams.Celebrations over those performance even included Costa Rica’s president, Luis Guillermo Solís, who joined thousands of Ticos on the streets of San José.La Sele then achieved an even bigger upset by defeating Greece in the round-of-16 match. The game ended 1-1 in regular time and was decided by a penalty shootout.With a 4-3 lead, Costa Rica goalie Keylor Navas kept his star status growing by deflecting a shot by Theofanis Gekas. Then, defender Michael Umaña smoothly knocked in the last goal that eliminated Greece and sparked a celebration all across Costa Rica.At quarterfinals, the dream ended for La Sele with another penalty shootout that unfortunately favored the Netherlands, with the Dutch squad scoring all of their shots, and goalie Tim Krul saving shots by Bryan Ruiz and Michael Umaña.Nevertheless, back home La Sele received a heroes’ welcome and will end the year with an undefeated mark of 12 consecutive matches. They also ended as the North and Central American regions’ best-ranked team, placing 15th on FIFA’s overall list, ahead of both the United States and Mexico.To round up a great year, Keylor Navas, Bryan Ruiz, Joel Campbell are part of the Tico honorees in six different categories at the 2014 CONCACAF Awards.2. Tico goalie Keylor Navas signs with legendary club Real Madrid Keylor Navas poses with a Real Madrid jersey. AFPPrior to his outstanding performance at the Brazil World Cup, where he was one of the top-three goalies, Tico star Keylor Navas completed an impressive season with his Spanish club Levante UD that earned him Spain’s Best Goalkeeper award at the Professional Football League Awards ceremony for the 2013-2014 season.Then, in August, Navas became the first Costa Rican to sign with Spain’s world-famous club Real Madrid, on a transfer from Levante.The club paid the €10 million ($13.5 million) buyout clause to Levante that took Navas to Spain’s most succesful club. He now is competing with Spain’s national team keeper Iker Casillas for a spot on the roster.His arrival to Real Madrid, however, has been anything but easy, with Navas playing only a few official games. “No player likes to be on the bench. I practice hard every day and try to be prepared for the moment I get the chance to play,” he told members of the news media.In October, a bizarre case in Costa Rica involving illegal prying into his personal life by law enforcement officials had him in the spotlight again, for all the wrong reasons.Costa Rican Supreme Court justices reported that 24 Judicial Investigation Police (OIJ) officers and four prosecutors searched a police database a total of 51 times for personal information on Navas and two of his sisters earlier this year.At the time, OIJ Director Francisco Segura said, “we have no reason to investigate Keylor Navas or any of his relatives. We don’t know why these people did this.” Segura then confirmed the judicial branch had no open investigation of Navas and there was no legal legal justification for the snooping by law enforcement employees.With his new team, Navas won the UEFA Super Cup 2014 in August, and on Dec. 20 the FIFA Club World Cup. Three days later Navas won CONCACAF’s Player of the Year.3. Marriage of [World] Champions Costa Rica’s first — and currently only — boxing world champions on Saturday beat their opponents by knockouts. (Courtesy of Canal de Boxeo)Hanna Gabriel and Bryan “El Tiquito” Vásquez, who are married, earned the country its firsts and only World Boxing Championships.Gabriel won her first title in 2009 when she took the World Boxing Organization (WBO) welterweight (147 pounds) World Championship. In 2010, Gabriel defeated the Dominican Republic’s Gardy Pena in Bayamón, Puerto Rico, to win the WBO junior middleweight (154 pounds) World Champion title in a fight that lasted only 11 seconds.She succesfully defended her title twice, but in 2013 she lost to Dominican Oxandia Castillo by a knockout in the second round.On Dec. 20, Gabriel regained the World middleweight title in a victory by technical knockout to Mexican Paty “Elegante” Ramírez, 36 seconds into the second round of a fight held in San Juan, Puerto Rico.That same night in Quintana Roo, Mexico, her husband “Tiquito” Vásquez also won his fight by a technical knock out against Mexican Sergio “Yeyo” Thompson, who refused to come out in the ninth round.The fight was Vásquez’s defense of the World Boxing Association Super featherweight title (130 pounds) he won in San José in 2011.However, despite winning the fight, the title will be vacant as Vásquez prior to the fight registered a weight of 133 pounds, meaning he will have to fight again to regain his title.4. Following historic World Cup performance, coach Jorge Luis Pinto quits the team Costa Rica’s Colombian coach Jorge Luis Pinto reacts during a Group D football match between Italy and Costa Rica at the Pernambuco Arena in Recife during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on June 20, 2014. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP“I like this group. Do not be afraid. We are confident that we will do a great job. The fiercer the bull, the better the fight,” Costa Rica’s coach Jorge Luis Pinto told media following the draw for the World Cup, where La Sele landed in the “Group of Death.”But after leading Costa Rica to its greatest World Cup performance ever, the Colombian in July failed to reach a deal with the Costa Rican Football Federation (FEDEFUT) and left the team.At a press conference the coach said that despite his interest in remaining in charge of the team, several of his requests to continue were not accepted by FEDEFUT. Among his requirements Pinto had asked for the dismissal of assistant coaches Paulo Wanchope and Luis Marín. He wanted to replace them with Colombian staff.The situation then escalated when Pinto told international media that one of the main reasons he would leave the team was that one of his assistants (it was later revealed that he was referring to Wanchope) had been boycotting his job and that FEDEFUT members were looking for his dismissal from the beginning of his time with the team.Several Sele players and other team staff members came to the defense of Wanchope and said the Colombian coach kept an excessive disciplinary regime that included surprise night visits to their bedrooms to see if they were already sleeping. Others claimed that he often was verbally abusive with players and staff members.Wanchope provisionally took over as coach of La Sele during several matches following the Brazil Cup. FEDEFUT currently is in search of a new coach who will be charged with qualifying La Sele for the 2018 World Cup in Russia.On Dec. 19, Pinto was announced as the new head coach of Honduras.5. Las Ticas had a historic year Carolina Venegas (9) celebrates with Katherine Alvarado, who assisted her in scoring an impressive bicycle kick in the last minute. Gloriana Villalobos (7) runs to join the celebration. AFP/The Tico TimesAlso known as La Sele, the Costa Rican Women’s National Team had a great year, earning their first qualification to a World Cup, something Las Ticas had only achieved in youth tournaments.La Sele in October participated in the CONCACAF qualification tournament in the United States, where they took their group’s top spot with a 3-0 record against Jamaica, Martinique and Mexico. Then, in semifinals, the team beat Trinidad and Tobago in a penalty shootout with an impressive performance by keeper Dinnia Díaz, who set a national record of three penalty shots detained in a qualifier match.Díaz’s stellar job sparked a national debate following a headline used by a sensationalist newspaper that printed a cover with her photo under the word “Keylar,” a name alluding to the men’s Sele goalie. The comparison infuriated more than a few people, and even led to an op-ed appearing in The Tico Times on the issue.The controversy went viral with people commenting on the unfortunate cover with several phrases of disapproval, including a popular one entitled “Her name is Dinnia, not Keylar.”The team secured a spot for the World Cup Canada 2015 and reached the tournament’s final match against the world’s No. 1 team, the U.S. The powerful Gringa squad had no troubles taking the title with a 6-0 routing of La Sele.The match, however, was a taste of what the team can expect at the world competition, and a reminder that they have a lot of homework to do in the meantime.6. Good start on the waves Jenny Kalmbach, a Tica SUP surfer and racer, now lives in Hawaii. Ashley Harrell/The Tico TimesJenny Kalmbach in May gave Costa Rica its first-ever medal at the Stand Up Paddling (SUP) World Championship in Nicaragua.Born and raised in Costa Rica, she currently is a resident of Kona, Hawaii. She took a bronze at the SUP technical women’s race, which took place on May 11.Kalmbach was part of the six-member group that represented Costa Rica for the first time, although she was the only one who brought an award back home.She started practicing the sport many years ago as a surf instructor, and eventually garnered the attention of more than a half-dozen sponsors. Kalmbach participates regularly in international competitions.No other Costa Rican advanced to the finals of the surf or distance competitions in Nicaragua.Read more Year in Review 2014 stories here Facebook Comments Related posts:Saprissa pounds Kansas City to advance to CONCACAF Champions League quarterfinals Costa Rica women’s nat’l team beats Trinidad and Tobago, qualifies for 2015 World Cup Jamaica Part II: Will Costa Rica’s La Sele find its killer instinct? Costa Rica football’s next big stars: 7 players who could shine for La Sele in the futurelast_img read more

US airports airlines battle through blizzard

first_imgSource = e-Travel Blackboard: P.T A blizzard wreaking havoc in America’s Midwest has been predicted to cause flight delays and cancellations.United Airlines and American Airlines are offering affected customers flexible travel options and alternatives.United said customers planning to visit airports in Chicago, Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, Grand Rapids, Lincoln, Madison, Milwaukee, Moline, Omaha and Wichita should check flight status updates regularly.“Customers ticketed on flights to, from or through airports in the path of the storm may reschedule their itineraries with a one-time date or time change, and the airline will waive the change fees,” United Airlines said in a statement.Passengers can source details, eligible travel dates, updates and make changes on the United Airlines website.Alternatively, customers can contact United Reservations at 800-UNITED-1.Customers ticketed on American Airlines, American Eagle or AmericanConnection flights on either 20 or 21 December to, from, or through the cities listed below, and whose ticket was issued no later than Dec. 19, may have their ticket reissued without a change fee for one ticket change.Cedar Rapids, Chicago, Des Moines, Grand Island, Grand Rapids, Green Bay, La Crosse, Madison, Manhattan, Marquette, Milwaukee, Moline, Omaha, Rochester, Sioux City, Traverse City, Waterloo, Wausau and Wichita.To change travel dates, contact American Reservations at 1-800-433-7300 within the U.S. or Canada.Customers outside the U.S. or Canada are encouraged to check American’s website for more information.AccuWeather has reported rapidly deteriorating roadway conditions from eastern Colorado to central Nebraska and northwestern Kansas.last_img read more

Tax department will announce starting date of tax return submission

first_imgThe tax department said Thursday it will announce when the income tax form will be available online as well as the deadline for its submission.The department assured the public that ample time will be given to taxpayers to file the necessary forms.All tax returns starting from 2017 must be submitted online through taxisnet.At present, the department urged taxpayers who have not yet registered with https://taxisnet.mof.gov.cy to do so using the number sent to them.For more information:Nicosia                Limassol               Larnaca                Paphos                 Famagusta22446215             25803717             24803590             26804398           2381185622446191             25803737             24803705             26804364           2381143622446192             25803799                                                                          2381151822446194             25803797            24803725              26804365           2381214922446213             25803796                                                                          2381145722446202             25803765             24803625            26804366          2381216022807492             25803786                                                                          2381145322807415             25803783                                                                           2381149022807409                                                                                                          23811458last_img read more

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” President Goodluck Jonathan may be compelled to drop one of his ministerial nominees from Delta State, but I’m not going to let him take me out, the 64th-ranked Gojowczyk beat American Steve Johnson 7-6 (3). read more